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The Energy Bill Relief Scheme

D-ENERGi would like to commend the Government Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and all civil servants involved working around the clock to implement the Energy Bill Relief Scheme. We appreciate BEIS efforts in working with all non-domestic suppliers over the last few weeks. We would like to take this opportunity to reassure our prospective and existing customers and clarify the following:

  • The scheme is only open to customers which have signed agreements with their suppliers from the 1st April 2022 onwards. The Energy Bill Relief Scheme comes into effect from the 1st October and a discount will be applied until 31st March 2023.
  • All energy suppliers will apply the same discount. This discount will automatically appear on your statements.
  • The BEIS department recommends all customers continue to enter into fixed price agreements as normal to shield businesses from future wholesale price increases. This way we can ensure all our customers are protected from the volatility in the current wholesale market.
  • As portrayed in some media outlets there is no price cap for businesses. The price cap is on the wholesale element price only. Please do not expect the unit rates of 21.1 p/kwh for electricity and 7.5 p/kwh for gas to appear on your bills. These rates do not include the many other non-commodity costs which make up your bill for both gas and electricity.
  • For customers who qualify for the Energy Bill Relief Scheme we kindly ask all qualifying customers to provide us with monthly gas and / or electricity meter reads until end of the scheme. This should be done ideally on the first day of the month or no later than the 10th.This will be a great help to get your bills as accurate as possible and ensure we apply the right discount throughout the scheme period.

For the latest information on the Energy Bill Scheme please visit www.gov.uk/guidance click here

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Incorporated in 2002 we have become one of the longest established and well respected UK independent businesses energy suppliers.

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Main Form

2 Feb

Is Shale being backed at expense of developing biomass?

by D-ENERGi

 

The UK is continuing to keep renewable energy investors at arms length by backing shale gas at the expense of developing biomass.

That is the verdict of analysts at consultancy Ernst & Young (EY), who warn that the British government “is now playing catch-up with investors who are not short of opportunities in other countries.”

EY also highlights that dedicated biomass power plants were conspicuously absent from the strike price package and notes that the government’s “controversial move toward shale gas appears to be at the expense of biomass power, which arguably still has a critical role to play in expanding the UK’s low carbon base-load power.”

And EY also concludes that the government’s failure to set a 2030 decarbonisation target has “undermined confidence in its commitment to renewable energy.”

“The government must come up with a credible and consistent energy plan that offers in a timely manner the clarity and information required to make long-term investment decisions.”

He warned that “the government is now playing catch-up with investors who are not short of opportunities in other countries. This is no time for complacency, as important pieces of the jigsaw are still missing if we want to produce an attractive framework.”

Warren was speaking as EY today released its Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Indices (RECAI), which does what it says on the tin – ranks countries on how attractive they are to investors in terms of their political and regulatory landscape.

The US and China retain the number one and two slots respectively, and Germany remains in third place, despite a bleak outlook for the renewables market.

EY states that despite strong public support for a green economy, rising political tensions ahead of next month’s election “are paralysing investment in the sector.”

“Calls to reform the feed-in tariff scheme ignore the relatively small impact of new renewable plants on the consumer surcharge, while rhetoric about the ‘affordability’ of Germany’s energy supply has not translated into policy statements.”

Australia drops from fourth place to sixth – replaced by the UK – because of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s plans to scrap the country’s fixed carbon price a year ahead of previous proposals – a move EY states “would cost A$3.8 billion (€2.5 billion) and take the price of carbon from A$25 (€17) to just A$6 (€4), potentially delaying investments.”

The RECAI also states that last year, €9.6 billion of renewable energy assets were sold by major utilities, representing a third of total merger and acquisition activity globally in 2012, with European utilities accounting for 87 percent – or €8.2 billion – of this divestment value.