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15 years of experience
15 years of experience
15 years of experience

18 Jan

What is a Kilowatt-Hour?

by Simon Thompson
 
You may have come across the term business electricity rates per kWh while looking at energy providers, but what you may not know is what it actually means and how your kWh usage compares to other businesses. A kilowatt-hour (or kWh) is the name given to the unit of energy that all energy companies use to measure how much electricity or gas you are using. In simple terms, it refers to how much power you are using over a period of time – so a 1kWh drill, for example, will use 1 kilowatt of energy per hour. Why do you need to know what a kilowatt-hour is? Some people think that the kWh is the most important piece of information on your bill, as it not only lets you know how much energy your business is using but how much you are paying for it as well. If you have had a bill that was a lot higher than you expected, for example, you can use your kWh to work out which parts of your business are using more gas and electricity than others. This will lead you to know what parts of your business use the most energy and should drive you to find ways to help these parts of your business to run more efficiently. It is also helpful to know what a kWh is so that you can fully understand what you are looking at when you are comparing business energy prices per kWh. What is the difference between kW and kWh? The easiest way to understand the difference between a kilowatt (kW) and a kilowatt-hour (kWh) is: kW = the power needed to make a device work kWh = the amount of energy used over a period of time Think of your electrical devices as a car where the kW’s refer to the speed you are driving at and the kWh referring to the distance you are going. The more miles you cover, the more your petrol costs will be, and the more kWh you use the higher your energy bills will be. As a rough estimate, 1kWh will let you use a desktop computer for 4 hours. Where can I find kWh on my energy bill? You can find your kWh on your energy bill under ‘usage’ and it will usually show the abbreviation kWh. This will tell you: How many kWh you used over the billing period How much you pay per kWh Your latest meter readings   If you want to compare energy prices to see if you can find a lower kWh price, then please get in touch with the D-ENERGI team today.
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15 Jan

Electric Cars: What Impact Could They Have On Your Business Energy Bill?

by Simon Thompson
 
Electric cars are an eco-friendly alternative to diesel and petrol cars, but while electric car owners definitely save money at the fuel pumps, what effect does running an electric car have on your business energy bill? Electric vehicles (also known as EV’s) have grown massively in popularity in recent years, as the range available, and the performance has dramatically improved. However, sales of Plug-in electric vehicles still only account for around 3% of total vehicle sales in the UK, despite sales of fully electric vehicles growing by 61% from June 2018 to June 2019. The UK Government is currently working on a proposal to ban all diesel and petrol cars by 2035, however, so this is going to have a huge effect on sales as it will mean that the mainstream option for drivers in the future will be electric vehicles. Types of Electric Car Before deciding to switch your business car fleet to electric vehicles, you need to have an understanding of the different types of electric cars available. The most common types of an electric car are: Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs). 100% battery-powered motor, sometimes known as all-electric, fully electric, or battery-only electric vehicles. You can usually expect about one to two hundred miles of driving per charge. Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs). Run-on a combination of the battery-powered motor with a diesel or petrol engine as a back-up. A battery can run a car for up to 70 miles, with the internal combustion engine providing back-up power for longer journeys and higher speeds. Hybrid Electric Vehicles. A self-charging hybrid that powers the battery from the car’s own braking system, through a combination of electricity and fuel. They don’t need plugging in but they will need topping up with fuel. Should you buy electric cars for your business? Most people tend to associate electric cars with environmental benefits, but the costs benefits associated with them are just as impressive. For example, running costs for electric vehicles can be lower than diesel or petrol vehicles. Fully electric vehicles don’t require any fuel at all, and even plug-in hybrids use less fuel than a standard car. Fully electric cars are also exempt from paying road tax, the London congestion charge, and Ultra Low Emission Zone charges too. Aside from the lower running costs, there are also grants available which can help make the cost of owning an electric car much more palatable too. The cost of charging an electric car Whilst electric car owners save on fuel and tax, it is important to remember that they will have to consider the cost of charging. In a similar way to the cost of filling up with petrol or diesel, the cost of charging an electric vehicle will vary as well, and tends to depend on: The size of your car battery How much you pay per unit of electricity   D-ENERGi offers off-peak charging and a GoElectric Tariff, and you can also choose to spread the cost of a charger and standard installation over the length of your electricity agreement. To find out more, please get in touch.
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11 Jan

Why Should You Undertake A Business Energy Comparison?

by Simon Thompson
 
If there is one thing we know well here at D-ENERGi it is this – not all business energy contracts are created equal! If business owners pick the wrong one, then they could end up overpaying for their business gas or electricity – and this just won’t do. If you’ve never undertaken a business energy comparison or switched business energy suppliers before, then it is likely that you are currently sat on an “out of contract” rate which can be up to twice as expensive as contract rates. What are ‘out of contract’ rates? Out of contract rates is the name given to the default tariff that your business energy supplier will place you on either: When your current contract has ended and you haven’t arranged to go onto a new one (either with your existing supplier or a new supplier) When the switching process to another supplier has been delayed – so there is a gap between the end of your first contract and the start of your new one   The only way you can avoid paying out of contract rates is to sign up for a new energy deal, either with your current business energy supplier or a new one. The simplest way to complete a business gas or business electricity comparison is to use the team at D-ENERGi. We work with a wide range of energy suppliers, to make sure you not only get outstanding service but access to great rates as well. We are experts at guiding you through the whole business energy comparison process, but it will give us a head start if you have some of the relevant information to hand already and some idea of what sort of tariff you might want to switch to. What are the main business energy tariffs I need to know about? Fixed-rate. Usually last between one and four years, with the standing charges and unit cost staying the same throughout this time. Your bill amount will change dependent on the amount of energy you use, obviously, but the actual rates you pay won’t. Fixed-term tariffs tend to be the most popular type for businesses as they help you to avoid price hikes. Blend and extended. A bit more complex than fixed rate deals, these deals allow you to extend your current contract with your supplier to take advantage of lower rates as a reward for your loyalty. Flex approach. When running a large business, it can sometimes be more cost-effective to bulk buy your energy in advance so you know how much you have paid for it when you come to use it. Flex approach contracts allow you to pay for your energy for the months ahead while also taking advantage of favourable wholesale rates. Pass through. This type of tariff splits your bill between fixed wholesale energy costs and the other varied items which make up the unit rates. This is a complicated tariff that is more suited to those who don’t require much price certainty.   At the end of the day, the quickest and easiest way to do business electricity or business gas comparison is to speak to the friendly team at D-ENERGi.
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8 Jan

Why Should You Think About Electric Cars For Your Business?

by Simon Thompson
 
Electric cars are growing in popularity, and are increasingly being seen as a viable mode of transport for drivers – not just those who are environmentally aware, or tech-savvy. In fact, electric cars can offer you a wealth of benefits – especially if you are thinking about investing in them for your business fleet. The benefits of electric vehicles are clear to many car manufacturers already, with over 20 manufacturers producing electric models already – and more and more planning to join in.  This means there is now a variety of choices when it comes to EV’s (electric vehicles) so whatever your budget or needs, leasing or purchasing an electric car is now more of an attractive proposition than it ever was. Yes, sometimes the upfront costs can be higher, but over the life of the lease, your business could benefit from major cost efficiencies, greater convenience, better performance, and less of an impact on the environment around us. The main benefits associated with electric cars are: Environmental benefits. Pure electric vehicles are built without an exhaust, so they, therefore, don’t emit any exhaust gases, which has a major effect on local air pollution – especially in noisy and congested cities Discounts on congestion charges. If your business is based in a “Clean Air Zone” area then you will be exempt from paying any congestion charges if your business car fleet is electric vehicles. The cost savings for your business could be enormous. If you are based in London, for example, you could save up to £2875 a year per car Lower running costs. One of the main advantages of running an electric car is that they are much cheaper to run than petrol or diesel cars. You may also benefit from free or low-cost charging at some workplaces or council-owned sites. If your car is pure electric then you also don’t have to pay road tax, while plug-in hybrids receive a £10 discount. Electric cars also tend to have fewer moving parts than petrol or diesel cars, and so maintenance and servicing tend to be cheaper. Government funding towards a charging point. At the moment, the UK government is offering a Workplace Charging Scheme which provides eligible businesses with a grant towards installing workplace charging points. Reduced company car tax on electric cars. During 2020/2021 there was zero tax on Benefit in Kind, and this will increase to 1% in 2021/2022 and 2% in 2022/2023. Capital allowances for businesses. Cars with C02 emissions of less than 50g/km are eligible for 100% first-year capital allowances, so you can deduct the cost of the entire car from your pre-tax profits.   To support the wide range of business owners who are now changing over to electric car business fleets, D-Energi are now offering EV charging points for business and home. If you’d like to find out more about that, and our off-peak charging & Go Electric tariff, please get in touch.
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