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15 years of experience
15 years of experience
15 years of experience

2 Jun

Half Hourly Electricity: A Full Breakdown

by Sarah Wilkinson
 
Every day in the energy market things are changing, it can get a little frustrating from time to time trying to keep up with the new rules and regulations. We don’t want you to feel left in the dark regarding half hourly meters. Therefore we have tried to break it down as best we can to hopefully ease your mind. Essentially, sites with a pinnacle load above 100kW are required to be introduced to a half hourly (HH). Half hourly meters can also be referred to as 00 meters. HH record data from consumption every 30 minutes – this information is communicated to the Supplier. Half hourly meters can be found in a stretch of economic sites   Ranging from call centres, manufacturing sites, supermarkets all the way to sites which consume as much as places like Manchester Airport, half hourly meters can be found everywhere! Over 160, 000 sites are affected by this so it is definitely worth checking if you are part of this large number, further explanation on finding out how can be found below. If your site requires a HH it is vital you have a Meter Operator (MOP). MOP is an organisation in the energy industry who hold the responsibility for installing and maintaining electricity and gas meters. They also provide the technical meter details to the Data Collector to enable collection of consumption data. A HH Data Collector is in charge of collecting HH consumption data from the meter. The data is then certified and passed to the supplier for billing. HH meters allow you to understand your consumption and provides you with a reliable source of information for your businesses energy management. What more could you ask for? HH meters can be a great way to save your business money for other beneficial investments. Finding out if you have a HH meter is easy. All you have to do is check the number next to your supply number marked ‘S’ – if the number reads 00 then you have a half-hourly meter. Pricing for HH can vary. The following charges may appear on your bill if you have a HH Meter: Energy Charges: based on your usage, usually split between day and night. Once you are on a HH meter, you should never receive an estimated bill. This is measured in kWh. Capacity Charges: this charge relates to the Available Capacity for your site. The Average Capacity is the demand for your site which is agreed with the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) and they ensure this is available to you. Reactive Power Charge: this is the difference between the working power and the total power consumed. If a site has a high reactive power, more current has to flow to provide the same output. This means more capacity has to be provided, potentially increasing costs for DNO.   If you would like to know more about half hourly meters then please do not hesitate to call us on 0800 781 7626 or alternatively take a look at our dedicated half hourly electricity page by following this link: https://www.d-energi.com/products/half-hourly-electricity/
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23 Mar

What Is P272?

by Jordan Garnett
 
What is P272? P27what? You aren’t alone in the dark about P272.  P272 is regarded as one of the biggest shakeups to the business electricity market since deregulation. Sounds more like a character out of star wars,  but here are some facts on P272,  which we have put together hopefully jargon free. If you unsure on how P272 affects your business please do not hesitate to contact us for free on 0800 781 7626, we will be delighted to help you further. You may also like to view our infographic and visit our support page dedicated to the P272 OFGEM legislation. The Facts – What Is P272 P272 is a new regulation which has been implemented by OFGEM. It affects the way suppliers settle electricity consumption for businesses with a specified energy use. Resulting in sites being changed to half hourly. Remember, remember the 5th November… “Guy Fawkes?”. No, no… this is when the P272 migration began! The deadline for all sites to be settled to Half-Hourly is 1st April 2017. Don’t be fooled by the date, it really is 1st April! Also, don’t be put off by the 2017 threat – it’ll be here before you know it! The settlement is being put in place in order for suppliers to balance the amount of energy being purchased from the Generators. The aim for P272 is to make the readings more accurate via the half hourly consumption. This will provide distributors with more understanding on electricity use. This results in networks ensuring they are sufficiently developed and maintained. Ultimately, P272 helps you and your business manage and also use the energy smartly. It gives you the opportunity to see where and when you are consuming energy. Also, a more accurate settlement which could lead to better tariff rates… something nobody would say no to, agreed? Now you (hopefully) have a little more understanding of P272 here is how to prepare: Learn if your portfolio is affected. Speak to your supplier, they will be more than happy to explore your options with you. Select your Half-Hourly Meter and Data Collector. If your business has a maximum demand electricity supply categorised by profile classes: 05 06 07 08 And you have an Automated Meter Reading meter of which is capable of HH data collection and remote programming. Just to let you know… 160,000 sites are affected so it is definitely worth double, maybe even triple checking! “How do I check?!” I hear you say? Simple… you just check the S number at the top of your electricity bill to find out your sites profile class.   Believe it or not, P272 can be very beneficial for you and here’s why: You receive accurate billing It offers you the ability to avoid peak times of electricity use It gives you an insight on your energy usage It allows you to make room for an opportunity of improvement and efficiency REMEMBER… This is an OFGEM regulation affecting ALL maximum demand meters and ALL electricity suppliers equally. If you’re being advised P272 does not affect your business, please let us double check this for you.  
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2 Feb

What to do in the Event of a Power Cut

by denergi admin
 
  Though power cuts are not a common occurrence they are not unheard of either and so it is important to be aware of what to do in the event of one. The first step should always be to check the trip switch which can be found in your fuse box (if you don’t know where this is it is vitally important to locate it and make yourself familiar with it now incase of an emergency). The trip switch only trips when there is a problem with the wiring of the internal circuit and not the incoming supply. You can test this by following these steps: Make sure the Trip switch is in the ‘On’ position Press the ‘push to test’ button If this doesn’t trip the switch then there is no incoming supply of electricity If the switch does trip then it is either because of a faulty appliance, a light may have gone or there is an issue with the internal wiring.   Once you have confirmed that it is not an internal fault you need to check to see if other buildings in the area have been affected as this will be one of the questions you are asked when you contact your Distribution Network Operator. Finally, once you have established whether it is an issue with your supply or a localised problem you must contact your Distribution Network Operator. The country is broken up into LDZs (Local Distribution Zones) and each one is maintained by a different Distribution Network Operator. To find out which company you need to contact and the relevant telephone number please follow this link. Important things to help you prepare for, and get through, a power cut: Always make sure you have candles or torches in an obvious and easy to reach place, make sure any lit candles are placed in a safe place and are not left unattended Leave at least one light switch turned on so that you know when the power has returned If possible keep everyone in one room and wrap up warm if it’s winter As far as possible unplug electrical appliances Once power has returned make sure that any food in freezers has not thawed   It is always wise to be prepared for these circumstances and to be aware of the location of your fuse box and how it works. These simple steps will help you to deal with a power cut efficiently and hopefully minimise the length of time you are without power.
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2 Feb

What To Do In A Gas Leak

by denergi admin
 
  Should you smell gas or suspect there has been a leak of other fumes such as carbon monoxide you should  call the free 24 hour national emergency number on 0800 111 999 immediately. It is the responsibility of your gas distributor to make your property safe but the following will outline what precautions you should take after you have called 0800 111 999 and then what steps need to be taken after the engineer has visited.    Natural Gas   If you are able to smell gas then please ensure you follow these steps: Call the national emergency number on 0800 111 999 Do not use your mobile phone to make this call if you are in the property where there is a suspected gas leak. If your only option is to use a mobile phone then make the call either outside or in a neighbouring property Open all doors and windows Never use matches, lighters or any other type of naked flame Do not smoke Do not switch any electrical appliances on or off, this includes doorbells and lights Ensure that the gas supply to any appliances has not been left on and that the pilot light on any boilers has not gone out If you know how to and feel comfortable doing it then turn off the gas supply at the meter   It is not your responsibility to fix any gas leaks at your property, this is the responsibility or your gas distributor and once you have reported the leak through the national emergency number they will visit your property free of charge. Make sure the engineer is a Gas Safe registered engineer and request to see the necessary documentation confirming this. If the leak is in a domestic property they may be able to make it safe by switching off the gas supply. Provided they are able to the gas engineer will fix the leak there and then, if not they will isolate the faulty appliance and switch the gas back on if it is safe to do so. Once the engineer has completed all the work they are able to they will leave all the relevant information concerning who to contact should any repairs need to be made. If the fault is with the distribution company and you are left without gas for more than 24 hours you will be entitled to compensation. You will need to contact your supplier should this apply to you.   Carbon Monoxide   A carbon monoxide leak is just as dangerous as a natural gas leak, though it is not combustible like natural gas it is poisonous and restricts your bloods ability to transport oxygen around your body. However, it is much more difficult to notice as carbon monoxide is colourless and odourless but there are indicators to look out for: Flames on gas appliances burn orange or yellow instead of blue There is undue condensation on your windows There is visible soot or a scorched look on any gas appliances The pilot light on any of your boilers frequently goes out The easiet possible way is to invest in a carbon monoxide detector, the Gas Safe Register states the following on their website: “Gas Safe Register recommends the use of audible carbon monoxide alarms. It should be marked to EN 50291 and also have the British Standards’ Kitemark or another European approval organisation’s mark on it. CO alarms usually have a battery life of up to 5 years. Fit an alarm in each room with a gas appliance. Always follow the alarm manufacturer’s instructions on siting, testing and replacing the alarm. Do not use the ‘black spot’ detectors that change colour when carbon monoxide is present, they don’t make a sound. It is important to choose an alarm that will wake you up if you’re asleep, or you may not be aware of early CO symptoms until it is too late.”   If you suspect there is a carbon monoxide leak or your carbon monoxide alarm has alerted you to one then you must: Leave the property immediately Call national emergency number on 0800 111 999 If any from the property is displaying any of the following symptoms seek urgent medical attention as they may be suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning: headaches dizziness nausea breathlessness collapse loss of consciousness Turn off any appliances and do not switch them back on until they have been checked Ensure that any and all repairs are completed by a Gas Safe registered engineer   Following these steps will help to ensure the safety of anyone at a property affected by either a natural gas leak or carbon monoxide leak. As a matter of precaution make sure the national emergency number is kept somewhere prominent in the property so that it can be found by anyone in the event of any kind of leak and that any residents or employees at the property are aware of the above.
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