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15 years of experience
15 years of experience
15 years of experience

5 Apr

Complete Guide to Your Electric Vehicle Charging Station

by Simon Thompson
 
With the charging infrastructure in the UK growing rapidly, this article will tell you everything you need to know about your electric vehicle charging station. Electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids are becoming more and more popular and are increasingly better developed than they have previously been and so the number of electric vehicle charging points is growing on a daily basis. There is still a little confusion over the terminology involved with electric charging, as it is still such a new technology, so this guide will hopefully clear up a little of the jargon involved. What is an electric vehicle charging station? There is no standard definition for an electric vehicle charging station at the moment, but the most widely held belief is that if there is more than one electric vehicle charging point in the same place then it becomes a ‘station’. This may not be on a petrol station forecourt though – charging stations tend to be tucked away in the corner of a car park somewhere – either a motorway service station or a multi-storey somewhere. You may be able to find individual charging points on the street still, and some local councils are looking into some experimental ideas such as lampposts with charging points attached, but the move towards more electric vehicle charging stations is being mainly driven by a change in consumer behaviour. How many public electric vehicle charging stations are there? According to Zap-Map, a company that monitors the charging infrastructure within the UK, there are currently around 14764 locations providing 23128 individual chargers. It is interesting to note that these numbers are continually increasing, with 773 charging points being added to the map within the last 30 days alone. This means there are now more electric vehicle charging points in the UK than there are petrol and diesel stations! How long does it take to charge an electric vehicle? If you think about the wide variety of electric vehicles available and the number of companies who offer electric vehicle charging points, then it should come as no surprise that the actual length of time it takes to charge an electric vehicle can vary wildly as well. The length of time taken usually relies on how many kWh the charging station offers and how many the electric vehicle can accept, and there are three different charging rates: Slow charging rate = 3 kWh (around 8 hours to fully charge from empty) Fast charging rate = 7 to 22 kWh (around 4 hours to fully charge from empty) Rapid charging rate = 43 to 50 kWh (around 30 minutes to charge 80%)   Hopefully, this has cleared up some of your questions about electric vehicle charging. We are focusing on this subject for our next few blog posts, so keep reading to find out more.
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22 Jan

How Taking Your Company Car Fleet Electric Will Impact Your Bottom Line

by Simon Thompson
 
There can’t be a business out there that doesn’t want to achieve more by spending less. Being energy efficient is crucial to how most companies operate – but you might not have thought about how energy efficient your company car fleet is. Why are electric cars so popular? The world is changing, as more and more individuals (and businesses) are starting to think about the impact they are having on the environment, and the need to make their environmental footprint as small as possible. One way of doing this is switching from a conventional fleet of vehicles to electric vehicles –  after all, they not only offer your business a way to help the planet and improve your reputation – but you could also make significant cost savings as well. What are the advantages associated with having electric cars as company cars? There are numerous advantages for your company of having electric company cars, and these include: Less cost over the lifetime of the vehicle – huge cost savings on fuel + less or no road tax to pay = a much healthier bottom line Savings on Ultra Low Emission Zone and congestion charges – if your business is located in London And the savings don’t stop there, your employees will also be happy driving electric cars as: They can claim 4p per mile when driving the company car on the business Charging up their electric vehicle at work is also exempt from tax They will access significant road tax savings How much does it cost to run an electric car? All business owners need to know is that it is far cheaper for them to run a fleet of electric vehicles than it is standard vehicles – on both fuel costs and tax. You will also benefit from lower maintenance costs as well – as there will be no need for oil or air filter changes, or new fans, head gaskets, spark plugs, or timing belts. This is due to the fact that the battery is one working unit, as opposed to the dozen different working units you get in a normal combustion engine. What other costs do we need to think about? If you are moving over to a fleet of electric vehicles, you will probably want to think about installing charging points in your business’s car park. However, there is a Government grant available at the moment which is offering businesses money towards up to 20 charging points. Having electric charging points on-site can also help your reputation, as potential clients and suppliers can see your green credentials – as well as enticing them to stay longer on your site while they charge their car! At D-ENERGi, we are passionate about saving businesses money. This is why we offer an EV charging solution and an off-peak and GoElectric tariff. Please get in touch to find out more.
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15 Jan

Electric Cars: What Impact Could They Have On Your Business Energy Bill?

by Simon Thompson
 
Electric cars are an eco-friendly alternative to diesel and petrol cars, but while electric car owners definitely save money at the fuel pumps, what effect does running an electric car have on your business energy bill? Electric vehicles (also known as EV’s) have grown massively in popularity in recent years, as the range available, and the performance has dramatically improved. However, sales of Plug-in electric vehicles still only account for around 3% of total vehicle sales in the UK, despite sales of fully electric vehicles growing by 61% from June 2018 to June 2019. The UK Government is currently working on a proposal to ban all diesel and petrol cars by 2035, however, so this is going to have a huge effect on sales as it will mean that the mainstream option for drivers in the future will be electric vehicles. Types of Electric Car Before deciding to switch your business car fleet to electric vehicles, you need to have an understanding of the different types of electric cars available. The most common types of an electric car are: Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs). 100% battery-powered motor, sometimes known as all-electric, fully electric, or battery-only electric vehicles. You can usually expect about one to two hundred miles of driving per charge. Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs). Run-on a combination of the battery-powered motor with a diesel or petrol engine as a back-up. A battery can run a car for up to 70 miles, with the internal combustion engine providing back-up power for longer journeys and higher speeds. Hybrid Electric Vehicles. A self-charging hybrid that powers the battery from the car’s own braking system, through a combination of electricity and fuel. They don’t need plugging in but they will need topping up with fuel. Should you buy electric cars for your business? Most people tend to associate electric cars with environmental benefits, but the costs benefits associated with them are just as impressive. For example, running costs for electric vehicles can be lower than diesel or petrol vehicles. Fully electric vehicles don’t require any fuel at all, and even plug-in hybrids use less fuel than a standard car. Fully electric cars are also exempt from paying road tax, the London congestion charge, and Ultra Low Emission Zone charges too. Aside from the lower running costs, there are also grants available which can help make the cost of owning an electric car much more palatable too. The cost of charging an electric car Whilst electric car owners save on fuel and tax, it is important to remember that they will have to consider the cost of charging. In a similar way to the cost of filling up with petrol or diesel, the cost of charging an electric vehicle will vary as well, and tends to depend on: The size of your car battery How much you pay per unit of electricity   D-ENERGi offers off-peak charging and a GoElectric Tariff, and you can also choose to spread the cost of a charger and standard installation over the length of your electricity agreement. To find out more, please get in touch.
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11 Jan

Why Should You Undertake A Business Energy Comparison?

by Simon Thompson
 
If there is one thing we know well here at D-ENERGi it is this – not all business energy contracts are created equal! If business owners pick the wrong one, then they could end up overpaying for their business gas or electricity – and this just won’t do. If you’ve never undertaken a business energy comparison or switched business energy suppliers before, then it is likely that you are currently sat on an “out of contract” rate which can be up to twice as expensive as contract rates. What are ‘out of contract’ rates? Out of contract rates is the name given to the default tariff that your business energy supplier will place you on either: When your current contract has ended and you haven’t arranged to go onto a new one (either with your existing supplier or a new supplier) When the switching process to another supplier has been delayed – so there is a gap between the end of your first contract and the start of your new one   The only way you can avoid paying out of contract rates is to sign up for a new energy deal, either with your current business energy supplier or a new one. The simplest way to complete a business gas or business electricity comparison is to use the team at D-ENERGi. We work with a wide range of energy suppliers, to make sure you not only get outstanding service but access to great rates as well. We are experts at guiding you through the whole business energy comparison process, but it will give us a head start if you have some of the relevant information to hand already and some idea of what sort of tariff you might want to switch to. What are the main business energy tariffs I need to know about? Fixed-rate. Usually last between one and four years, with the standing charges and unit cost staying the same throughout this time. Your bill amount will change dependent on the amount of energy you use, obviously, but the actual rates you pay won’t. Fixed-term tariffs tend to be the most popular type for businesses as they help you to avoid price hikes. Blend and extended. A bit more complex than fixed rate deals, these deals allow you to extend your current contract with your supplier to take advantage of lower rates as a reward for your loyalty. Flex approach. When running a large business, it can sometimes be more cost-effective to bulk buy your energy in advance so you know how much you have paid for it when you come to use it. Flex approach contracts allow you to pay for your energy for the months ahead while also taking advantage of favourable wholesale rates. Pass through. This type of tariff splits your bill between fixed wholesale energy costs and the other varied items which make up the unit rates. This is a complicated tariff that is more suited to those who don’t require much price certainty.   At the end of the day, the quickest and easiest way to do business electricity or business gas comparison is to speak to the friendly team at D-ENERGi.
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