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15 years of experience
15 years of experience
15 years of experience

12 Apr

What Do You Need To Know About Electric Vehicle Charging Regulations UK?

by Simon Thompson
 
With the UK Government focusing quite heavily on their plans for a zero-emission future, we take a closer look at the electric vehicle charging regulations uk that you need to know about. There has been a steady stream of Government initiatives over the past few years that have made their plans for the direction of travel quite clear. The focus has clearly been placed on electric vehicles, and the provision of the infrastructure to support them (primarily electric vehicle charging point installation) which is critical to their plans to reduce the amount of carbon emissions in the country. The need for more progress to be made in the field of electric vehicle charging is shown most clearly in a recent report from The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders which revealed the sales of electric vehicles has recently skyrocketed. Yet, the country as a whole still seems to be in a period of transition. The Government has announced that the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles will end in 2040, and there is currently a lot of work being done around the mandatory provision of electric vehicle charging points in a new home and commercial building developments in the future. The Government also recently pledge money for local councils to draw on if they wanted to install street charging points for electric vehicles, where there was a car parking space available for them to do so. However, this is not enough. More still needs to be done to deliver a coherent electric vehicle charging infrastructure across the UK at scale, to give drivers the confidence that they will be able to find a charging point wherever they travel. In the meantime, however, if you as an individual want to install an electric vehicle charging point, the planning rules are much clearer. You do not need to get planning permission to install an electric vehicle charging unit on a wall if it is in an area which you are legally using for off-street parking – provided certain conditions are met – and these are: The electrical outlet must not exceed 0.2 cubic metres in size The electrical outlet must not face onto or be within two metres of a highway You cannot install an electrical outlet on a listed building or on a site designated as a scheduled monument There are also several considerations you need to take into account for leasehold properties, for example: Landlord consent may be required for installation to take place Additional rights for access and maintenance may be required, as well as an obligation to repair There needs to be a clear allocation of responsibilities   Whilst most of the planning regulations relating to the installation of electric vehicle charging points for personal use are clear, you may want to think about looking for electric vehicle charging stations near me instead, as then all the hard work has been done for you.
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5 Apr

Complete Guide to Your Electric Vehicle Charging Station

by Simon Thompson
 
With the charging infrastructure in the UK growing rapidly, this article will tell you everything you need to know about your electric vehicle charging station. Electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids are becoming more and more popular and are increasingly better developed than they have previously been and so the number of electric vehicle charging points is growing on a daily basis. There is still a little confusion over the terminology involved with electric charging, as it is still such a new technology, so this guide will hopefully clear up a little of the jargon involved. What is an electric vehicle charging station? There is no standard definition for an electric vehicle charging station at the moment, but the most widely held belief is that if there is more than one electric vehicle charging point in the same place then it becomes a ‘station’. This may not be on a petrol station forecourt though – charging stations tend to be tucked away in the corner of a car park somewhere – either a motorway service station or a multi-storey somewhere. You may be able to find individual charging points on the street still, and some local councils are looking into some experimental ideas such as lampposts with charging points attached, but the move towards more electric vehicle charging stations is being mainly driven by a change in consumer behaviour. How many public electric vehicle charging stations are there? According to Zap-Map, a company that monitors the charging infrastructure within the UK, there are currently around 14764 locations providing 23128 individual chargers. It is interesting to note that these numbers are continually increasing, with 773 charging points being added to the map within the last 30 days alone. This means there are now more electric vehicle charging points in the UK than there are petrol and diesel stations! How long does it take to charge an electric vehicle? If you think about the wide variety of electric vehicles available and the number of companies who offer electric vehicle charging points, then it should come as no surprise that the actual length of time it takes to charge an electric vehicle can vary wildly as well. The length of time taken usually relies on how many kWh the charging station offers and how many the electric vehicle can accept, and there are three different charging rates: Slow charging rate = 3 kWh (around 8 hours to fully charge from empty) Fast charging rate = 7 to 22 kWh (around 4 hours to fully charge from empty) Rapid charging rate = 43 to 50 kWh (around 30 minutes to charge 80%)   Hopefully, this has cleared up some of your questions about electric vehicle charging. We are focusing on this subject for our next few blog posts, so keep reading to find out more.
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22 Mar

How to Save On Business Electricity?

by Simon Thompson
 
Electricity bills are some of the largest expenses that many business have to deal with. If you are running a business yourself, then it is highly likely you are wanting to find out more about how monitoring costs and reviewing your firms energy efficiency can help you save on business electricity. Here are some tips for you on how you can do just that! Switch tariffs at the end of your contract. When your business electricity contract comes to an end, you will usually be automatically rolled over to a more expensive tariff, which is known as an ‘out-of-contract’ rate. If this has happened to you, then you need to sort it quickly, as it can lead to large bills. The best thing to do in this instance, then, is to compare business electricity per kwh from a wide range of suppliers, to find the tariff that is the best for you. Complete an energy audit. As well as looking at whether there is a cheaper tariff out there that would be better for you, you can also complete an energy audit of your business which will not only give you an overview of how your company uses energy, but also what areas of waste there are. The Carbon Trust has lots of guides and tools available to help you with this, or if your turnover is more than £50 million or you have more than 250 staff then you can have an energy audit completed as part of the Government’s Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) Turn equipment off when it is not being used. We all have a large amount of equipment in our businesses, such as desktops, printers, tv’s and so on. Do you know if they are turned off overnight or at weekends when they are not in use? Every piece of equipment that is left on may only be costing you pennies individually, but when added it up it can mean a larger bill than expected at the end of the month Use the right kind of meter. When it comes to switching your energy supplier, you may also be offered a smart meter, if you don’t already have one installed. If you are a larger business, you may be offered a half-hourly meter instead. Both of these options are a good idea as they help your supplier to base your bills on the exact amount of electricity you are using, which will also encourage you to be more energy efficient   If you want to compare business energy per kwh to find out whether you can get a better deal or not, then get in touch with the team at D-ENERGi and let us take care of that headache for you.
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15 Mar

Half Hourly Electricity Tariffs Explained

by Simon Thompson
 
If you feel like your business electricity bill is extraordinarily high, then it may be due to incorrect metering – which is actually more common than you might think. This can be a huge problem, especially if your business is an energy-intensive one. These types of businesses tend to have their energy consumption monitored through the use of half hourly electricity meters, which also gives them access to half hour electricity tariffs. What is half hourly electricity? Half hourly electricity is based on the use of a half hour electricity meter which captures the details of your businesses’ electricity usage and sends it to your supplier every half an hour. This means that your business electricity supplier can more accurately charge your business based on the electricity you are actually using – which minimises the risk associated with incorrect billing. This type of meter also allows you to carry on tailoring your electricity contract to more accurately meet the needs of your business, meaning once you have checked out the half hourly electricity tariffs available you can decide to go for fixed rate charges, giving you absolute certainty on your monthly budget, or take a gamble on flexible rate tariffs hoping that the price of energy goes down and not up! How do half hourly electricity meters work? Half hourly electricity meters are fully automated, they have to be in order to be able to take and submit accurate readings on a regular basis. They rely on an internet connection or phone line to send your usage details to the supplier, meaning you don’t have to do a thing! Your supplier will then use these readings to calculate your monthly charges. Can I switch my current half hourly electricity tariff for a cheaper one? If you are looking to save money on your energy bills, then it is a good idea to get a half hourly electricity quote from a variety of suppliers, compare these quotes and switch to the supplier who you feel offers you the best deal. We recommend that you compare half hourly electricity prices using the D-ENERGi team, as they are adept at negotiating deals with business electricity suppliers – something that can be hard to do if you don’t have a lot of experience in the business energy market.
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