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15 years of experience
15 years of experience
15 years of experience

10 May

Everything You Need to Know About Electric Car Charging in the UK

by Simon Thompson
 
In the past, the sales of electric cars have struggled for two main reasons: a lack of places to charge them and worries about electric car charging cost UK. Does the UK now have the electric car charging infrastructure in place to support the more widespread use of electric cars and how practical would an electric car be for you? And what about charging costs? Where to charge your electric car Most electric car owners charge their cars at work or at home as most cars are parked for hours outside offices or homes and so this is the perfect way to make sure your battery is fully charged ready for when you need it. A modern 7kw car charging unit will take around four hours to fully charge a Nissan Leaf from a flat – which seems achievable in an average working day or during an overnight charge at home. If you don’t install a charging point and just charge from your normal home electricity supply, however, this will take significantly longer and will therefore end up costing you more. With this 4 hours fully charge information in mind, this can make a 200-mile round trip in an electric car a more feasible prospect, plus it will only cost a few pence in electricity compared to pounds in diesel or petrol. The stumbling block, therefore, comes when you need to go further than 200 miles. How can you get a top-up when you are out and about, and what about electric car charging points cost uk? Well, there is good news and there’s bad news. The good news is that there are now around 40500 charging devices in the UK spread over about 15064 locations and these numbers are increasing by the day. The bad news is that these chargers are going to cost you money, as networks want money in return for you using their electricity. The hidden bonus from this though, is that you will no longer see cars using the charging point that doesn’t really need to – people will only use them when they absolutely need to! The UK’s electric car charging network If you have previously driven a petrol or diesel car then you will be used to the convenience of stopping at a petrol or service station to fill your car up. And these seem to be aplenty. However, although you will have to factor more time in to fill up your electric car, the actual process isn’t that dissimilar, as there are plenty of charging points situated on major trunk roads and convenient locations throughout the UK. If you are interested in an electric car but are worried about electric vehicle charging point cost UK, then please get in touch with the D-ENERGi team as we can not only help you with electric vehicle charging but also make sure your energy tariff is the lowest it can be too.
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3 May

What is the Cost of an Electric Car Charger at Home?

by Simon Thompson
 
Whether you are looking to buy an electric vehicle or already have one, considering electric car charger home cost UK is going to be important. Some people may prefer to use their electric vehicle for a while before they go down the route of installing an electric car charger at their home address while others will want it installed before they even have the car delivered. Whichever of these types of people you are, it is important to realise that being able to charge your electric car at home is going to be critical, as more than 90% of EV car owners charge their car at home. If you are thinking about having an electric car charger installed but are worried about electric vehicle charging cost UK then read on to find out more about how it doesn’t need to be expensive and it really isn’t that complicated either. How much does an electric car charger for the home cost? A recent report by the RAC revealed that the average cost for a home charging point for an electric car is £800 – however, this can be significantly increased or decreased depending on the type of charger that you go for. If this seems like a lot of money don’t panic too much, as the UK Government is currently offering a grant of up to 75% or £350 as a maximum, towards the cost of new charge points. So, technically, you could end up paying as little as £100 to have a home charging point installed, with the average cost being somewhere around £450. If you think about the savings you will make in terms of fuel over the coming months though, you will soon recoup that cost. How much power will a home electric car charger use? You may be interested to learn that the power used by electric cars is measured in kilowatts, which is the same measurement we use for electricity. Electric car batteries vary in capacity but can range from as little as 17 kWh (for something like the Smart ForTwo EQ) right up to 100 kWh (for something like the Tesla Model S). To work out how much power you will need to fully charge your electric car, you should divide the battery capacity by the speed of charging. To work out the cost of a full charge, just multiply your battery capacity by the amount you pay for electricity. You can also talk to us about the possibility of swapping to an energy tariff that is aimed at electric car drivers, which can cost as little as 5p per kilowatt during off-peak hours. If you are interested in finding out more about electric vehicle charging UK then please get in touch with the D-ENERGi team as we can not only help you with electric vehicle charging but also make sure your energy tariff is the lowest it can be too.
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19 Apr

What Does Electric Vehicle Charging Installation Cost?

by Simon Thompson
 
In this article, we will take a look at everything you need to know about electric vehicle charging, including how to charge an electric vehicle and how much does an electric vehicle charging installation cost? Charging an electric vehicle at home If you want to charge an electric vehicle at home then you need to have a home charging point installed, so that you can hook your electric vehicle up to it when you park it. If you don’t have a charging point installed yet, you can use an EVSE supply cable connected to a 3-pin plug socket as a backup occasionally. Most electric vehicle owners choose to have a home charging point installed as it has built-in safety features, and is a much faster way to charge the car. A home charger tends to be a weatherproof unit that is mounted to a wall and features a connected charging cable or a socket for plugging in a portable charging cable. Electric vehicles have either Type 1 or Type 2 connectors, so you will need to make sure you choose the right home charger which is compatible with the type of connector you have on your vehicle. Cost of installing an electric vehicle charger When it comes to electric car charger installation cost UK, this normally starts from around £449 – if you take advantage of the UK Government’s OLEV grant. If you are an electric vehicle driver you could be eligible for a £350 OLEV grant towards purchasing and installing an electric car charger at your home. Once you have installed your electric car charger, you then only need to pay for the electricity you use to charge the car – which will vary depending on your supplier. It is good to know, though, that the average cost of driving an electric car is between 2p and 5p per mile, which means you could save around £1000 a year more than petrol or diesel car drivers. How fast can you charge your electric vehicle at home? Charging speed for electric vehicles is measured in kilowatts per hour (kWh). Most home charging points offer you charging speeds of between 3.7 kWh and 7 kWh giving you between 15 and 30 miles of range per hour of charge. However, the maximum charging speed may be limited by your vehicle’s onboard charger, so it won’t matter if you have a 7-kWh charger if your car only allows a 3.7 kWh charge. If you are interested in an electric vehicle smart charging consultation, then please get in touch with the D-ENERGi team as we can not only help you with electric vehicle charging but also make sure your energy tariff is the lowest it can be too.
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12 Apr

What Do You Need To Know About Electric Vehicle Charging Regulations UK?

by Simon Thompson
 
With the UK Government focusing quite heavily on their plans for a zero-emission future, we take a closer look at the electric vehicle charging regulations uk that you need to know about. There has been a steady stream of Government initiatives over the past few years that have made their plans for the direction of travel quite clear. The focus has clearly been placed on electric vehicles, and the provision of the infrastructure to support them (primarily electric vehicle charging point installation) which is critical to their plans to reduce the amount of carbon emissions in the country. The need for more progress to be made in the field of electric vehicle charging is shown most clearly in a recent report from The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders which revealed the sales of electric vehicles has recently skyrocketed. Yet, the country as a whole still seems to be in a period of transition. The Government has announced that the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles will end in 2040, and there is currently a lot of work being done around the mandatory provision of electric vehicle charging points in a new home and commercial building developments in the future. The Government also recently pledge money for local councils to draw on if they wanted to install street charging points for electric vehicles, where there was a car parking space available for them to do so. However, this is not enough. More still needs to be done to deliver a coherent electric vehicle charging infrastructure across the UK at scale, to give drivers the confidence that they will be able to find a charging point wherever they travel. In the meantime, however, if you as an individual want to install an electric vehicle charging point, the planning rules are much clearer. You do not need to get planning permission to install an electric vehicle charging unit on a wall if it is in an area which you are legally using for off-street parking – provided certain conditions are met – and these are: The electrical outlet must not exceed 0.2 cubic metres in size The electrical outlet must not face onto or be within two metres of a highway You cannot install an electrical outlet on a listed building or on a site designated as a scheduled monument There are also several considerations you need to take into account for leasehold properties, for example: Landlord consent may be required for installation to take place Additional rights for access and maintenance may be required, as well as an obligation to repair There needs to be a clear allocation of responsibilities   Whilst most of the planning regulations relating to the installation of electric vehicle charging points for personal use are clear, you may want to think about looking for electric vehicle charging stations near me instead, as then all the hard work has been done for you.
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